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n September 28,1920, one day after the 1919 World Series fix had been exposed, Eddie Cicotte admitted his involvement to Charles Comiskey's attorney Alfred Austrian. Cicotte was quickly taken to the Criminal Courts Building where he was questioned by Assistant State's Attorney, Hartley Replogle. By 11:30 that morning, Cicotte was in front of a Grand Jury. In tears, Cicotte admitted "I've lived a thousand years in the last twelve months. I don't know why I did it. I must have been crazy."

Within hours of Cicotte's confession, Joe Jackson would also go to Austrian and Replogle admitting his involvement. For two hours Jackson was questioned on the details of the fix. Afterwards, Jackson would tell two bailiff's "I got a big load off my chest."

above left to right: Chick Gandil (center) conferring with his attorneys
Attorney Hartley Replogle questioning Joe Jackson. Defendants Swede Risberg (left), Buck Weaver (center), Happy Felsch (right) and their attorneys.

Pitcher Lefty Williams would be the third player to come forward that day. Like Cicotte and Jackson, Williams would sign a waiver of immunity and a confession.

By the end of the day, all eight Black Sox players along with ballplayers Hal Chase, Bill Burns, gamblers Abe Attell, Rachael Brown (Nat Evans), John "Sport" Sullivan, Dave Zelcer, Ben Levi and Carl Zork had been indicted. Additionally, the eight Black Sox players were each sent a telegram from Charles Comiskey which read: "You and each of you are hereby notified of your indefinite suspension of the Chicago American League Baseball Club." The telegram also stated that "If you are innocent of any wrongdoing, you and each of you will be reinstated."

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